Stalking

 
While legal definitions of stalking vary from one jurisdiction to another, a good working definition of stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.

Stalking is serious, often violent, and can escalate over time.

Some things stalkers do:

  • Follow you and show up wherever you are.
  • Send unwanted gifts, letters, cards, or e-mails.
  • Damage your home, car, or other property.
  • Monitor your phone calls or computer use.
  • Use technology, like hidden cameras or global positioning systems (GPS), to track where you go.
  • Drive by or hang out at your home, school, or work.
  • Threaten to hurt you, your family, friends, or pets.
  • Find out about you by using public records or online search services, hiring investigators, going through your garbage, or contacting friends, family, neighbors, or co-workers.
    • Posting information or spreading rumors about you on the Internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth.
    • Other actions that control, track, or frighten you.

    You are not to blame for a stalker's behavior.

    (reprinted with permission from the National Center for Victims of Crime)

National Center for Victims of Crime

The National Center for Victims of Crime created the Stalking Resource Center to provide comprehensive information on stalking, including fact sheets, statistics, and help for victims.