Upcoming Events

Tuesday, February 20, 2018 • 7:30 pm • Hoover 212

DALE W. BROWN BOOK AWARD LECTURE
Embedded: Quilts and Their Stories  

In this interactive presentation, Janneken Smucker will focus on what we can learn about the larger culture from individual stories of quilts—seemingly everyday objects that are in fact embedded with sentimental, historical, artistic, and spiritual heft. In addition to recounting stories from her book, Amish Quilts: Crafting an American Icon, she will share some of her family quilt stories and interview members of the community about their quilts. If you’d like to share your quilt story, contact Smucker at jsmucker@wcupa.edu by February 5.

Smucker, a fifth-generation Mennonite quiltmaker, is an associate professor of history at West Chester University, where she specializes in digital and public history and American material culture. In addition to lecturing and writing widely on the topic of quilts for both popular and academic audiences, she leads workshops on digital tools and strategies, consults on digital projects for non-profits and museums, and brings digital humanities into the undergraduate classroom. Amish Quilts received the 2016 Dale W. Brown Book Award for outstanding book in Anabaptist and Pietist Studies.


Thursday, March 22, 2018 • 6:00 pm • Susquehanna Room of Myer Hall

YOUNG CENTER BANQUET 

The annual Young Center dinner gives faculty, staff, students, church leaders, and other friends of the Young Center the opportunity to socialize and learn about the Center’s activities and programs.

A reception for Durnbaugh Lecturers Samuel and Rebecca Dali will be held at 5:30; the dinner will begin at 6:00.

Cost for the dinner is $23 and reservations are required by March 8.


Thursday, March 22, 2018  • 7:30 pm • Gibble Auditorium

DURNBAUGH LECTURES
“Update on Boko Haram Crisis in Northeastern Nigeria”
The Founding of CCEPI and Its Mission to the Displaced 

Samuel Dali will present an overview of the Boko Haram crisis, the devastation to the Church of the Brethren, and the church’s response. Rebecca Dali will give a brief history of the Centre for Caring, Empowerment, and Peace Initiatives (CCEPI) and discuss the plight of women in northeastern Nigeria, and IDPs (Internally Displaced Persons) and refugees in Cameroon. 

Samuel Dali led Ekklesiyar Yan’uwa a Nigeria, the Church of the Brethren in Nigeria, during the years of greatest insurgency violence in northeastern Nigeria. He works at peace building and advocacy with ecumenical, interfaith, and political entities in northeastern Nigeria as IDPs begin the long journey home. Samuel Dali holds degrees from the Theological College of Northern Nigeria and McPherson College, as well as a master's in theology from Bethany Theological Seminary and a doctorate from the University of Birmingham. Rebecca Dali is the executive director of the Centre for Caring, Empowerment, and Peace Initiatives, an organization she founded in 1989. She holds a bachelor's and a master's degree from the Theological College of Northern Nigeria and a master's degree and doctorate from the University of Jos.


Friday, March 23, 2018 • 10:00 am to noon • Susquehanna Room of Myer Hall

DURNBAUGH SEMINAR
“Leading a Peace Church in Terrorist Territory”
“CCEPI at Work:  Addressing the Plight of the Most Vulnerable”
 

Samuel Dali will discuss the state of the Church of the Brethren in northern Nigeria both before and after Boko Haram and reflect on his personal experience as the president of the Church of the Brethren in Nigeria during the time of crisis. Rebecca Dali will describe the most vulnerable populations (widows, children, orphans, and escapees) and efforts to feed, clothe, house, and empower them. She will also relate her personal experience in the danger zones of northern Nigeria. 

Samuel Dali led Ekklesiyar Yan’uwa a Nigeria, the Church of the Brethren in Nigeria, during the years of greatest insurgency violence in northeastern Nigeria. He works at peace building and advocacy with ecumenical, interfaith, and political entities in northeastern Nigeria as IDPs begin the long journey home. Samuel Dali holds degrees from the Theological College of Northern Nigeria and McPherson College, as well as a master's in theology from Bethany Theological Seminary and a doctorate from the University of Birmingham. Rebecca Dali is the executive director of the Centre for Caring, Empowerment, and Peace Initiatives, an organization she founded in 1989. She holds a bachelor's and a master's degree from the Theological College of Northern Nigeria and a master's degree and doctorate from the University of Jos.


Tuesday, April 17, 2018 • 7:30 pm • Hoover 212

KREIDER LECTURE
“Narrative and Meaning: The Rich Complexity of Old German Baptist Brethren Belief, Culture, and Practice”
 

The Old German Baptist Brethren (OGBB) see themselves as embodying and preserving the vision and traditions of the early Brethren of Schwarzenau. Narrative research contends that stories recounted by any collective about themselves (and the narratives told about them by others) provide an entrée into deep and more nuanced understandings of specifics of belief, practice, and identity. Tony Walsh will present and examine stories he's gathered to look at the rich spirituality, complex world and dynamic culture of the OGBB.

Walsh is the director of the Centre for the Study of Irish Protestantism and codirector of the Centre for Transformative Narrative Research at Maynooth University, County Kildare, Ireland. In recent years, he has edited and contributed to a number of books on radical adult education, the nature of knowledge, post-positivist research, suicide, international peacekeeping, and narrative reflexivity. He is currently interested in how minorities (particularly faith minority groups) identify themselves and resist or adapt to the influences of the majorities among whom they live. Currently, he has research involvements in Palestine, the UK, the US, and Ireland. Walsh was for many years a member of the Irish Methodist Council on Social Responsibility and was centrally involved in the leadership of one of Ireland’s first intercultural congregations. He continues as a visiting minister to a Baptist congregation in rural England.


Thursday, April 26, 2018 • 7:00 pm • Hoover 110

LECTURE
“World War I and Lancaster Peace Churches”
 

As the First World War was being waged in Europe, members of Mennonite and Brethren churches on the home front faced military conscription, government surveillance, and intense pressure to buy war bonds. The 1917 conscription law was ambiguous with regard to conscientious objection, although peace church members ultimately found a political ally in Lancaster County Congressman W. W. Griest. In this presentation, Steve Nolt will describe these dynamics and other ways that Lancaster’s peace church people experienced wartime pressures, sought to explain their convictions to their neighbors and to the government, and struggled to know how best to help those suffering from the war’s effects. (This talk is cosponsorerd by High Library, the Young Center, and the Center for Global Understanding and Peacemaking.)

Nolt is senior scholar at the Young Center and professor of history and Anabaptist studies at Elizabettown College. He is the author or coauthor of fourteen books on Amish, Mennonite, and Pennsylvania German history and contemporary life and series editor for Young Center Books in Anabaptist and Pietist Studies published by the Johns Hopkins University Press..